Search Results for: translation services

What is the difference between an interpreter (oral) and a translator (written)?
According to Danica Seleskovitch (1994), a translator converts the message in the written form and the interpreter does the same by using the oral form.  ASL interpreters use the gesture form. The skills for oral interpretation and written translation are very different.  Sleskovitch states that interpreters need to convey the message at a much higher speed than that of translators, at least 30 times greater.

How can I request a face to face interpreter (On-site)?

Massachusetts Assignments
If you do not already have a contract with CCCS, Inc.TM for interpreting services, then we encourage you to give us a call for a free quote at 781-497-5066 during our regular business hours, or at 781-838-2583 for after hours, weekends or holidays.

If you already do have a contract with us, then please call our interpreter services department at 781.729.3736 and press 2. If you call after regular business hours, on weekends or holidays, please contact us at 781.838.2583 (781.317.6749 pager). We have face-to-face interpreters available in 47 languages and we offer our services 24/7/365 days a year.

New Hampshire Assignments and other States?
If you do not already have a contract with CCCS, Inc.TM for interpreting services then we encourage you to give us a call for a free quote at 603-880-4949 during regular business hours, or at 1.888.678.2227 for after hours, weekends or holidays.

If you already do have a contract with us, then please call our interpreter services department at: 1.888.678.2227, and press 2. If you call after regular business hours, weekends or holidays, please contact us at 781.838.2583 (781.317.6749 pager). We have face-to-face interpreters available in 47 languages and we offer our services 24/7/365 days a year.

How should I decide on which interpreting services to request?
Our biases are that it is best to provide face-to-face and on-site interpreting services, but understand that it is not always possible.  At times interpreters are not available for face-to-face interpretation in all languages, however, the same interpreter request may be covered Over the Phone (OPI) in a five minute time frame, such as assisting a lost client, car accidents and other scenarios. ASL remote videoconferencing is not always recommended as clients may not sign and video may not represent clearly the three dimensional aspects of ASL language. Although, one is under the impression of saving money, the Office of Civil Right recommends that healthcare, educational and legal institutions contact their legal department regarding the best way to cover interpreter needs. It is also recommended that institutions review legal law suits concerning unsatisfactory interpreter coverage.

We encourage our clients to use Over the Phone Interpreters (OPI) as a back up to face-to-face interpreters, unless the LEP individual requests an over the phone interpreter as his or her first option. Patients have the right to choose their interpreting services modality.

How can I request an over the phone interpreter (OPI)?
Once you have established your account with CCCS, Inc.TM, you may request an Over the Phone Interpreter (OPI), by contacting us to obtain your personalized code that can be used when you dial the OPI # 1-866-999-0438. This number together with your personalized code will then give you access to OPI interpreters in more than 170 languages. After having made the interpreter request, a live interpreter will be on the line in less than 18 seconds in most instances.
 
Can you describe the interpreting modes offered by CCCS, Inc.TM?

Different modes, requires different skills and abilities, and many times in any given assignment more than one mode will be used. For this reason only interpreters that have been trained in the modes needed for a case will be assigned to cover that case. For example if a request is made for an interpreter to cover a conference, only interpreters with simultaneous experience would be considered for the case. We offer our services in the following interpreting modes:

  • Consecutive (Relaying of the message from one language to another in an organized manner, only after the speaker has completed a thought). This is the most recommended mode for healthcare interpretation by the Interpreter standards. It is also used for legal interpreting.
  • Simultaneous (The interpreter speaks at the same time as the speaker with minimal pauses). Used for groups, many legal cases, in mental health assessments and visits.
  • Sight Translation/Interpretation (The interpreter reads a document, understands it and provides an oral interpretation from the written source language into the oral target language). Provider is required to be present for any legal forms, such as consent forms.
  • Remote (Phone or Video interpretation)
  • Relay (More than one interpreter is used because there is not an interpreter available that can interpret from the target language to English directly. An example may be a patient that only speaks Guarani, and there is no interpreter available that speaks both Guarani and English. As a result, 2 interpreters would be needed so that the patient could receive effective communication. The first interpreter would interpret Guarani to Spanish and the second interpreter would interpret or relay the message from Spanish to English.)
  • Summary (The interpreter summarizes the main points. This mode is usually used when the speaker is not speaking in a logical manner.) Not recommended only for emergency situations where the message is not clear and the speaker is unable to slow down.

What languages does CCCS, Inc.TM cover?

CCCS, Inc.TM continues to add new languages to our list according to the demands of our customers. The following lists are subject to change at any time.

Face-to-Face
For face-to-face to interpreting CCCS, Inc.TM offers services in the following languages:

Albanian
Amharic
Arabic
Armenian
Bengali
Bosnian (Serbo-Croatian)   Cape Verdean Creole
Chinese
Farsi
French
German
Greek
Gujarati
Haitian Creole
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Hungarian
Italian
Japanese
Khmer
Korean
Laotian
Persian
Polish
Portuguese   (Continental) Portuguese   (Brazilian)
Punjabi
Pushto
Romanian
Russian
Serbo-Croatian   (Bosnian)
Somali
Spanish
Swahili
Tagalog
Thai
Turkish
Urdu
Vietnamese

Over the Phone Interpreting (OPI)
For Over the Phone Interpreting (OPI) CCCS, Inc.TM offers services in the following languages:

Albanian,
Acholi,
Afrikaans,
Akan,
Albanian,
American Sign Language,
Amharic,
Arabic,
Armenian,
Ashanti,
Assyrian,
Azeri,
Bahasa  (Malaysia), Bambara,
Basque,
Basaa,
Belarusan,
Bengali,
Bosnian,
Bulgarian,
Burmese,
Cambodian,
Cantonese,
Cape Verdean Creole,
Cebuano,
Chaldean, Chamorro,
Chin (Tedim, Zome)
Chinese
Yunnan,
Choujo,
Chuukese,
Cotocoli,
Czech,
Danish,
Dari,
Dinka,
Dutch,
Creole(French, Haitian), Croatian,
Estonian,
Ewe,
Farsi,
Fijian,
Finnish,
Flemish,
French,
French Canadian, Frisian,
Fulani,
Fulde,
Fuzhou,
GA,
Georgian,
German,
Greek,
Greenlandic,
Guarani,
Gujarati,
Haitian Creole,
Hakka,
Hausa,
Hebrew,
Hindi,
Hmong,
Hunanese,
Hungarian,
Ibo,
Indo,
Italian,
Jaaxanke,
Japanese,
Javanese,
Icelandic,
IIocano,
Kanjobal,
Hannada,
Karen,
Kazakh,
Khmer,
Kinyarwanda, Kirundi,
Korean,
Kosrae,
Kpelle,
Krahn,
Kunama,
Kurdish,
Lanzhou,
Lao,
Latvian,
Lebanese,
Lingala,
Lithuanian,
Luganda, Macedonian,
Maithili,
Malay,
Malayalam,
Maltese,
Mam,
Mandarin,
Mandinka,
Marathi,
Marshallese,
Mien,
Mixteco,
Mongolian,
More,
Myanmar,
Navajo,
Nepali,
Norwegian,
Nuer,
Oromifa, Pampangan, Pangasinan,
Pashtu,
Polish,
Ponapean, Portuguese,
Persian,
Pulaar,
Punjabi,
Quechua,
Romanian,
Russian,
Samoan,
Sara,
Serbian, Shanghainese, Shona,
Sichuan,
Sicilian,
Sinhalese,
Slovak,
Somali
Somali Maay,
Maay (Bantu) Soninke,
Spanish,
Sudanese Arabic, Swahili,
Swedish,
Tagalog,
Taiwanese,
Tamil,
Telugu,
Teochew,
Thai,
Tibetan,
Tingrinya,
Toisanese,
Tongan,
Rukese,
Turkish,
Turkmen,
Twi,
Uighur,
Ukrainian,
Urdu,
Uzbek,
Vietnamese,
Visayan,
Welsh,
Wolof,
Xhosa,
Yiddish,
Yoruba,
Zande

*Remote Video Interpreting (RVI) COMING SOON!
For Remote Video Interpreting (RVI) CCCS, Inc.TM will offer services in the following languages: 

American Sign Language
Albanian
Arabic
Azeri
Belarusian
Bengali
Bosnian
Bulgarian
Cambodian
Cantonese
Chinchow
Croatian
Czech
Dari
Dutch
English
Farsi
French
Fukien
German
Greek
Gujurati
Hebrew
Hindi
Italian
Japanese
Khmer
Kinyarwanda
Korean
Kurdish
Lebanese
Macedonian
Mandarin
Pashto
Persian
Polish
Portuguese
Punjabi
Romanian
Russian
Serbian
Sichuan
Sindhi
Somali
Spanish
Swahili
Tagalog
Taiwanese
Tamil
Telugu
Thai
Toishan
Twi
Urdu
Vietnanmese


Who are CCCS, Inc.TM’ clients?
We provide our services to:

  • Hospitals,
  • Schools
  • Clinics
  • Human resource departments
  • Housing authorities
  • Courts
  • Unions
  • Businesses
  • Legal institutions
  • Healthcare Conferences

Does CCCS, Inc.TM cover interpreting services 24/7?
Yes, we provide interpreting services 24/7/365 days of the year, from which we draw upon our more than 300 face to face interpreters that have all gone through extensive screening and in house seminars provided by CCCS, Inc.TM  We also offer over the phone interpreting services (OPI) which allows you to access an interpreter in the language needed, usually in less than 18 seconds. Following is a sample list of how some of our services are used:

  • Night and weekend coverage
  • Home Healthcare
  • Hospitals
  • Private practices
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse
  • Educational settings
  • Conferences
  • Community Meetings
  • Vacation, Holiday
  • Coverage for staff interpreters
  • Liaison programs
  • Voiceovers

Are CCCS, Inc.TM healthcare interpreters certified?
Certification is new and is not available in all languages. We encourage all healthcare interpreters to become certified and it will take several years if ever, for certification to be available in all languages. Currently there are two organizations that provide certifications for some languages. For more information please contact The National Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters (NBCMI) at www.certifiedmedicalinterpreters.org and the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) at www.healthcareinterpretercertification.org.  CCCS, Inc.TM supports CCHI in their endeavors to bring about a vendor-neutral approach to its certification program development. The National Board awarded its first certifications on July 8th, 2010, and CCHI began its first pilot testing on October 18th, 2010.

Is The Joint Commission mandating certification for all interpreters?
At this moment The Joint Commission has not mandated certification, and this is outlined in the letter sent by the Senior Vice President of The Joint Commission to the Senior Manager of Public Health Initiatives, dated November 6, 2009. In the letter The Joint Commission stated that they don’t require interpreters to be certified, but they do require organizations to only use interpreters that are competent and qualified.  As an institute and employer, we always encourage interpreters to continue their education, such as certification preparation.

Are CCCS, Inc.TM legal interpreters certified?
Certification is not available in all languages. We encourage all legal interpreters to become certified if it is available in their language. In the legal field, NJITCE is the only nationwide certification exam developed exclusively by judiciary interpreters and translators and is recognized in some, but not all states.  For the court system, certification is available but only for Spanish, Navajo, and Haitian Creole.  For the other languages an interpreter can become a “professionally qualified interpreter” or a “skilled interpreter.”  Different court systems have developed their own training and interpreter assessment programs. Do not confuse certification with an interpreter’s certificate. Many language companies offer certified interpreter services but they may be referring to interpreters with certificates not interpreters that are certified.

What is CCCS, Inc.TM doing about certification for Healthcare interpretation? 
CCCS, Inc.TM is very proud of its exceptional contracting standards with all of its interpreters and believes in encouraging and working with its superb interpreter pool in assisting them in completing the written component of the certification, and supporting those interpreters whose target languages have oral certification exam.

Within the next few years, all interprters will need to be certified in order to keep any job in Massachussetts and possibly nationwide. Soon there will be a mandate that all interpreters have a BA, plus interpreting training to be qualified for the certification.

How do I know that CCCS, Inc.TM interpreters are qualified?
All of our interpreters go through rigorous testing, that includes written and oral exams prior to working with us.  As well, all of our interpreters must have completed at least 40 hours of training in their field, with completing a 54-60 hour training, plus an 8 hour foundation assessment where we individually evaluate each interpreter’s skills in regards to interpreting, ethics, HIPAA, Confidentiality, Individual Privacy, Healthcare Safety Awareness, Sexual Harassment, and customer relations.

Once an interpreter has been contracted by CCCS, Inc.TM then their progress is continuously monitored to assure that our interpreters are delivering the quality expected of them.  Random shadowing of the interpreting session and continuous education courses help us to evaluate an interpreter’s progress.  The medical and legal fields are always changing and we expect our interpreters to always stay up to date through continuous education.
 
Regionally and nationally there are recognized languages of lesser diffusion for which finding fully trained and qualified interpreters is difficult due to the small size of the population, or the length of time present in the United States. For these challenging situations, CCCS, Inc.TM conducts a thorough screening of the proposed interpreter to ensure that the combination of interpreting experience, language proficiency and mastery of terminology are adequate for placement in your facility. If we find it necessary to assign one of these interpreters, we will obtain appropriate approval from your organization in writing before assigning the interpreter.
 
Do you have an ongoing quality assurance process?
For several years, CCCS, Inc.TM has had a Quality Assurance program and Customers can get a monthly report that includes incidents and CCCS, Inc.TM response to them. We also have invested in creating monthly quizzes and on-going mandatory internal trainings for all of our contractor interpreters, so that we can comply with the new regulatory standards from The Joint Commission.

Does CCCS, Inc.TM manage the yearly vaccination status for their interpreters?
Yes, all interpreters at the time of signing a contract with CCCS, Inc.TM need to show proof of updated required vaccinations (PPD, MMR) and suggested Hepatitis Bd. On a yearly basis we manage proof of PPD and we remind interpreters when there are due and remove interpreters from the pool if they do not comply with industry requirements.

Does CCCS, Inc.TM perform yearly Public CORIs on all your staff and interpreters?
Yes, CCCS, Inc.TM pays for a Massachusetts Publicly Accessible Background Check (CORI) on all our staff, interpreters and other consultants who have access to confidential information.

Can CCCS, Inc.TM tailor monthly reports according to our needs?
Yes, when signing your contract with CCCS, Inc.TM please let us know of your company’s specific needs so that we can design for you customized reports through our state of the art access program created by CCCS, Inc.TM  We can also compile customized reports that will help you meet the Joint Commission’s standards.
  
Whom should I contact to provide feedback on CCCS, Inc.TM services?
If you have any questions comments or concerns, you may speak with a member of our staff 24/7, 365 days of the year by calling 781.497.5066 or 1.888.678.2227 (out of state).  If it is an emergency, you may contact us at 781.729.3736 and then press 1, or at 781.838.2583 (781.317.6749 pager) after hours, weekends, or on holidays after hours or on the weekends.
 
Does CCCS, Inc.TM have errors and omissions insurance?
Yes we do, and we provide evidence of general and professional liability insurance to all of our clients that hold a current contract with us.
 
Do CCCS, Inc.TM interpreters follow the standards that are set out in HIPAA?
Yes, our interpreters undergo extensive screening before they are hired by CCCS, Inc.TM  Part of this screening includes checking to see if an interpreter possesses knowledge of HIPAA and if he or she understands its application.  Only interpreters that are aware of, and abide by the principles outlined in HIPAA are contracted by CCCS, Inc.TM

How long has CCCS, Inc.TM provided language services?
Active since 1996, CCCS, Inc.TM is a SDO, WBE/PBE & DBE certified organization located in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. CCCS can provide coverage throughout the entirety of those two states and also in the Greater New England region if given adequate notice. CCCS is proud to be one of the providers on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts interpretation contract (PRF63). Our mission is to provide professional interpreters for the limited English proficient (LEP) population in the healthcare, mental health, legal, educational, business and community settings.

CCCS, Inc.TM continues to add new languages, according to the demands of customers. For more information, please contact us at 781.497.5066 or 1.888.678.2227 (out of state). The following lists are subject to change at any time.

For interpreting, CCCS, Inc.TM offers services in the following languages:

Face to Face Languages

Albanian
Arabic
Amharic
Bengali
Bosnian
Bulgarian
Armenian
Cantonese
Cape Verdean Creole
Ewe
Farsi
French
Greek
Gujarati
Haitian Creole
Hindi
Italian
Japanese
Khmer
Kinyarwanda
Kirundi
Korean
Lingala
Mandarin
Nepali
Persian
Polish
Punjabi
Portuguese
Russian
Sangho
Serbo Croatian
Somali
Spanish
Swahili
Thai
Toisanese
Turkish
Ukrainian
Urdu
Vietnamese

 

For over the phone interpreting we offer interpreters in the following languages:

OPI Languages

Czech
Danish
Dari
Dinka
Dioula
Dutch
Edo
Estonian
Ewe
Farsi
Finnish
Flemish
French
French Canadian
French Creole
Fukienese
Fulani
Fulde
Fuzhou
Ga
Garre
Georgian
German
Greek
Guarani
Gujarati
Hainanese
Haitian Creole
Hakka (Chinese)
Harar
Hassaniya
Hausa
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Hokkien
Hungarian
Icelandic
Igbo
Ilocano
Ilonggo
Indonesian
Italian
Japanese
Jarai
Jiangsu
K’iche’ (Quiché)
Kannada
Karen
Karen (Pwo)
Karenni (Kayah)
Kazakh
Khmer
Kikongo
Kikuyu
Kinyamulenge
Kinyarwanda
Kirundi
Kituba
Kizigua (Kizigula)
Korean
Kosraean
Krahn
Krio
Kunama
Kurdish
Kurdish (Bahdini)
Kurdish (Kurmanji)
Kurdish (Sorani)
Kyrgyz
Lao
Latvian
Lautu
Lingala
Lithuanian
Lorma
Luganda
Luo
Maay-Maay
Macedonian
Malay
Malayalam
Mam
Mandinka
Mara
Marathi
Marshallese
Matu
Mbay
Mende
Mien
Mina
Mixteco (Alto)
Mixteco (Bajo)
Moldovan
Mongolian
Montenegrin
More
Mushunguli
Navajo
Nepali
Norwegian
Nuer
Oromifa
Pashto
Patois (Jamaican)
Pidgin (Cameroonian)
Pidgin (Nigerian)
Polish
Ponapean/Pohnpeian
Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese (European)
Portuguese Creole
Pulaar
Punjabi
Q’anjob’al
Rohingya
Romanian
Russian
Samoan
Sango
enthang
Serbian
Shanghainese
hona
Sichuan
Sicilian
Sinhalese
Siyin
Slovak
Slovene
Somali
Somali Bantu
Soninke
Soninke (Sarahuli)
Soninke (Sarakhole)
Soranî (Kurdish)
Sousou
Spanish
Swahili
Swedish
Sylheti
Tagalog (Filipino)
Taiwanese
Tajik
Tamil
Telugu
Temne
Teochew
Thai
Tibetan
Tigrinya
Toisanese
Tongan
Tosk
Trukese/Chuukese
Turkish
Twi
Ukrainian
Urdu
Uzbek
Vietnamese
Visayan
Wolof
Xhosa
Yiddish
Yoruba
Yup’ik
Zulu
Translation Languages
Albanian
Amharic
Armenian
Arabic
Bengali
Bosnian
Burmese
Bulgarian
Bhutanese
Cape Verdean (Creole)
Chinese S & T
Croatian
Dari
Danish
Dutch
English
Ethiopian
Farsi
Finish
French
German
Greek
Gujarati
Haitian Creole
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Indonesian
Italian
Japanese
Kinyardwanda (Rwanda)
Khmer
Kiche (Guatemala)
Lao
Lebanese (Dialect)
Lithuanian
Mai Mai (Somali)
Mongolian
Nepali
Norwegian
Pashto
Polish
Punjabi
Portuguese
Romanian
Russian
Somali
Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian or Croatian)
Swahili
Spanish
Tagalog (Phil)
Thai
Taiwanese
Tibetan
Toisanese (Chin. Dial)
Turkish
Tigrinya
Ukrainian
Urdu
Vietnamese

 

INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHIES

PRIMARY INSTRUCTORS

Zarita Araújo-Lane, MSW & LICSW

President & founder of Cross Cultural Communication Systems, Inc., is a Primary Instructor for Interpreting in Mental Health Settings and serves as an adjunct instructor in our other classes. She has over 30 years of experience working with cross-cultural populations in medical and mental health organizations. Ms. Araujo-Lane was the director of a mental health cross-cultural team for over ten years at Health and Education Services in the North Shore area. She has published articles on cross-cultural management including chapters written in 1996 and 2005 on “Portuguese Families” for the second and third editions of the book, Ethnicity and Family Therapy by Monica McGoldrick. Ms. Araújo-Lane leads the creative team responsible for the development of The Art of Medical Interpretation® training material series and has authored multiple articles for publications of the American Translators Association and other scholarly journals.

Vera Duarte, MA

Primary Medical Interpretation Instructor at CCCS, Inc., holds both a Bachelor’s degree and Master’s degree in Foreign Language Education from Portugal and in Applied Linguistics from the University ofMassachusetts. Ms. Duarte is certified by the Massachusetts Department of Education to teach ESL to grades 5-12. She currently teaches a course that addresses issues of minority students and academic achievement. She is the Teacher-in-Charge for the Bilingual and English Language Acquisition Department at Cambridge Rindge and Latin. She is a native speaker of Portuguese. She also speaks Spanish and French fluently. For the past three years, Ms. Duarte has been involved in designing, developing and implementing curriculum at CCCS, Inc. Ms. Duarte successfully completed The Art of Medical Interpretation® course at CCCI (54-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.), joined the CCCS, Inc. team as a Consultant and is currently the Primary Medical Interpretation Instructor and Curriculum Development Specialist. She was the main force behind the manual The Art of Medical Interpretation®, 3rd Edition.

Andrew Jerger, CHI & CMI

Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses is an experienced interpreter and instructor who has partnered with CCCI to develop curriculum and create online courses. Mr. Jerger spent 11 years in the Dominican Republic, teaching public speaking courses in Spanish, English language classes and Spanish reading and writing classes. Mr. Jerger successfully completed the Art of Medical Interpretation course at CCCI (54-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.) and went on to become a language coach before joining CCCI faculty in 2009. He has since completed certifications in both CHI & CMI.

Lourdes Alvarez, MS

Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses in New Hampshire. Ms. Alvarez holds a BA in Education in 1972 from University of Massachusetts Boston and a MS in Communication in 1980 from Boston University. Currently, Ms. Alvarez holds memberships with Mass Foreign Language Association, Mass Teacher’s Association and Association of Teacher’s of Spanish and Portuguese. Ms. Alvarez successfully completed The Art of Medical Interpretation course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.) and is currently a Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses and Consultant.

Mona Gebrael El Hachem, MS & CHI

Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses in Massachusetts. Ms. Hachem holds a BS in Education from Holy Spirit University, Lebanon (1999), BA in French from Lebanese University (2008) and as well as a MS in Sciences of Education Coordination from Saint Joseph University, Lebanon (2011) a MS in Sciences of Education in French instruction from Holy Spirit University, Lebanon (2011) and a certificate in Conflict Resolution and Mediation with an Excellence Award (2012) from UMass Boston. Ms. Hachem successfully completed the Art of Medical Interpretation® course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.) and is currently a Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses and interpreter. She was a language coach (French & Arabic) before joining CCCI faculty. Ms. Hachem has since completed certifications in CHI.

Laura J. Chavez, MA

Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses in Massachusetts. Ms. Chavez holds a Master of Arts from Harvard University, (2007) and Bachelors in Architecture from Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (2000). Ms. Chavez worked as a teacher assistant at the Cambridge Montessori School from 2004 to 2007, where she discovered her passion for teaching. Ms. Chavez successfully completed the Art of Medical Interpretation® course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.) and is currently a Primary Instructor for medical interpretation courses and an interpreter.

ONLINE INSTRUCTORS & CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

Dr. Dharma E. Cortés, PhD

Dr. Dharma E. Cortés has partnered with CCCI to develop curriculum and create online courses. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Psychology from the University of Puerto Rico, and a Doctorate in Sociology from Fordham University. She also completed postdoctorate training in Medical Anthropology at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Social Medicine. She is currently an Instructor at Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and senior research associate at the Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development and Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and a member of the Health Literacy Studies Group at the Harvard School of Public Health. She has been conducting research with Latinos in the United States for more than 20 years. Her work has focused on the study of culture, mental and physical health, health literacy and health and mental health service utiliza-tion research. Dr. Cortés has extensive experience implementing qualitative research methods such as focus groups, open-ended interviews and cognitive interviews for the purpose of developing survey instruments, theory verification and theory generation. Her past and current research combines qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Dr. Cortés is currently the principal investigator for a study funded by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services to evaluate the effectiveness of a low-literacy educational diabetes intervention among Spanish-speaking Latinos. She is also the principal investigator for one study funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Salud America! program to examine how a low-literacy consumer activation nutrition educational paradigm could be used to increase food literacy and change consumer behavior toward healthy eating among Spanish-speaking Latinos.

Cynthia E. Roat, MPH

Cynthia E. Roat is an international consultant on language access in healthcare. A native of upstate New York, she spent a decade working in rural areas of Latin America before moving to Seattle to earn her Masters degree in International Public Health from the University of Washington. Ms. Roat entered the interpreting world in 1992 and quickly became certified by Washington State as a medical and social-service Spanish-English interpreter. Her interest in systems change, however, led her into teaching interpreters, trainers and medical providers the basics of interpreting practice and consulting with healthcare administrators around the country on how to improve their language access programs. Most recently, Ms. Roat spent three years at Seattle Children’s Hospital, managing their unique Bilingual Patient Navigator program, before returning to her national consulting work.

Over the past two decades, Ms. Roat has made significant contributions, both in the U.S. and abroad, in many areas of language access. She is the author of a wide array of key resources in the field and the primary developer of the original version of Bridging the Gap, for many years the country’s most widely-offered training for healthcare interpreters. Her most recent book, Healthcare Interpreting in Small Bites, is being adopted as an ancillary text in many interpreter training programs. Ms. Roat has consulted for a variety of large medical centers and healthcare systems. Always concerned about building grassroots capacity, Ms. Roat has been a mentor to interpreters, trainers and Language Access Coordinators around the U.S. She is a founding member of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care (NCIHC), where she was a long-time Board member and Chair of various committees, a founding member of the Washington State Coalition on Language Access (WASCLA), and a former board member of the Northwest Translators and Interpreters Society (NOTIS) where she currently organizes regular interpreter training workshops through the Medical Special Interest Group. She is known nationally as an engaging speaker, a knowledgeable resource, and an energetic advocate for language access in general.

Amy Wilson-Stronks, MPP, CPHQ

Amy Wilson-Stronks has partnered with CCCI to develop curriculum and create online courses. Amy earned a Master of Public Policy Degree and a Certificate in Health Administration and Policy from the University of Chicago. She is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ). She is the Principal and Founde of Wilson-Stronks, LLC and, has more than twenty years’ experience working in healthcare as a quality improvement professional, researcher, and policy analyst advocating for improvements in patient safety and advances in equitable care for vulnerable populations. Amy is an experienced researcher, consultant, strategist, and trainer. She has a national reputation as a skilled and passionate expert dedicated to improving the delivery of healthcare.

Amy has developed training programs on cultural competence, patient-provider communication, and language access including a video produced in collaboration with the Office of Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She currently is leading the development of the GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality Quality Healthcare for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People, Webinar Series. Her publications include: Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient-and Family-centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals, published in 2010; One Size Does Not Fit All: Meeting the Health Care Needs of Diverse Populations, published in the spring of 2008; Exploring Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in the Nation’s Hospitals: A Report of Findings, spring 2007; and several journal articles.

While at The Joint Commission, she researched, developed, tested, and implemented healthcare accreditation standards for hospitals, behavioral healthcare, long-term care, and ambulatory care programs. Her research and development work includes infection control, restraint and seclusion, patient and family rights and responsibilities, patient-provider communication, cultural competence and diversity, language access, and patient-and-family-centered care. Securing more than one million dollars in grants, she served as the principal investigator of several pivotal studies including The Hospitals, Language, and Culture: A Snapshot of the Nation (HLC) study. This was the first large-scale qualitative study to investigate how hospitals address the cultural and linguistic needs of diverse patient populations. Amy’s leadership resulted in the adoption of the 2011 Joint Commission patient-centered communication accreditation standards for hospitals including standards specifically those related to language access, 24-hour support access, and non-discrimination. Prior to leaving the Joint Commission, she secured a grant to engage experts on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender health and healthcare, Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Community: A Field Guide. She served as the Principal Investigator prior to leaving The Joint Commission, continuing as Project Advisor for the duration of the project.

Natalie Ormonde Serra, MA

Natalie Ormonde Serra is a Consultant to CCCS, Inc. and has partnered with CCCI to develop curriculum and create online courses. Ms. Ormonde Serra, M.A., holds Bachelor’s degrees from Regis College (Weston, MA) in both Communications and Secondary Education, a Master’s degree in Intercultural Relations from Lesley University (Cambridge, MA), as well as, graduate studies in Portuguese Language and Culture from the University of Lisbon (Faculdade de Letras) in Lisbon, Portugal. Contributing to her experiences was the work she did for the Portuguese-speaking communities and students, as well as with the Portuguese Foreign Mission, Consulate-General of Portugal, in Boston, Massachusetts, Lesley University (Cambridge, MA), and both the Department of Education and Middlesex Community College of Lowell, MA. Ms. Ormonde Serra completed a qualitative study designed to explore the socio-cultural needs of culturally diverse Portuguese immigrant elderly women living in Lowell, Massachusetts and how they were being addressed; via a study titled “Portuguese Immigrant Elderly Women in Massachusetts: A Focus on their Socio-cultural Needs.” Ms. Ormonde Serra, has over a decade of experience working with a socio-cultural and linguistically diverse population. She is a native speaker of Portuguese with knowledge of both Spanish and French. In addition, Ms. Ormonde Serra successfully completed the Art of Medical Interpretation® course at CCCI (60-hour Certificate of Accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.).

Dr. Alessandro Baldan, PhD

Dr. Alessandro Baldan has partnered with CCCI to develop curriculum and create online courses. He is presently a Post Doc Associate at Baylor College of Medicine and completed a Doctorate Degree in Translational Biomedicine at University of Verona. Mr. Baldan graduated with a combined BSc-MSc in Molecular Biology at the University of Padova, Italy. Winner of the Erasum-Socrates Scholarship, he studied at the Paris XI University, France. Willing to improve his skills, Alessandro worked at the University College of London, tIK, on neuronal cells. In Italy, he worked in pre-natal diagnosis gathering more experience in genetics and chromosome diseases. He obtained another MSc in Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology. Alessandro also worked at Rutgeis, The University of New Jersey.

His research projects focus on the genetics of complex diseases like ASD and respiratory diseases. In particular, how the environment can interact with genes in the susceptibility to develop diseases. Furthermore, he works at the section of pediatrics at University-Hospital S.Arrna in Ferrara, Italy, on osteoporosis and aging. His research is funded by the European project Trans2Care aimed to improve healthcare.

Carina Araújo-Lane, BS

Carina Araújo-Lane currently works at Cross Cultural Communications Systems Institute (CCCI) as a program coordinator assistant and developer of a mental health online course for interpreters. She is also a research assistant at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, where she helps conduct qualitative research on mental illness and health insurance.

In 2015, Ms. Araujo-Lane completed the Public Health Associate Program (PHAP), a two-year fellowship with Center for Disease Control. Ms. Araujo-Lane was placed in Kern County Public Health Services Department in California. In her first year Ms. Araujo-Lane worked in a STD prevention, education and surveillance. In her second year, Ms. Araujo-Lane was an assistant to Call to Action, a countywide coali-tion focused on preventing obesity through policy, systems and environmental change.

Ms. Araujo-Lane graduated from Sarah Lawrence College with Bacherlor or Arts in 2013. She concen-trated in Psychology, Anthropology and Public Health. She has continued interest in women’s health, community outreach, mental health and health policy.

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS AND GUEST PRESENTERS

Dr. Richard S. Lane, MD, Medical Advisor and Adjunct Instructor

Primary Medical Interpretation Instructor for the development of the medical component for both Getting Ready for Your Written and Oral Healthcare Interpreter Certification Exam courses. Bilingual guest instructor in the medical interpretation courses and is a retired Internist in the Extended Care Facility Program at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates of Boston, MA. His interests in the healthcare field have included: the doctor/patient relationship, teaching interview skills to medical students and residents, cross cultural communication in medicine, care of elderly patients in rehabilitation and sub-acute units, as well as, palliative medicine and hospice care at end of life. He became board certified in Palliative Care and Hospice Medicine in 2005.

Hanaa Adi, MD, Adjunct Instructor

Bilingual guest instructor in the medical interpretation courses. Ms. Adi has completed a Doctorate in Medicine from Damascus University Medical School, Damascus, Syria (2000) and a ECFMG Certification from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, Philadelphia, PA (2010). Ms. Adi has practiced health related functions both in the United States and in Syria, including: Newton-Wellesley Hospital (2014), New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (2011), OB/GYN Private Practice, Zabadanir Syria, (2004-2010), New Maternity Hospital, Damascus, Syria (2000-2004), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2004) and Obstetrics and Gynecology (2000-2004). Ms. Adi has published Maternal Mortality Rates in Syria versus the Developing World (2004) and has received numerous awards. She is a trained medical interpreter and fluent in Arabic. Ms. Adi successfully completed the Intensive Art of Medical Interpretation™ course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.™) in 2015.

Anais Ramos, AA, Adjunct Instructor

Adjunct Instructor for medical interpretation courses in Massachusetts. Ms. Ramos holds an Associates in Education from Bunker Hill Community College, (2015) and is expected to receive a Bachelors in Education with a specialization in English Language Learners and a Minor in Mathematics from Lesley University, MA (2019). Ms. Ramos worked as a teacher assistant at the Everett High School and Edward Middle School in Charlestown, MA where she discovered her passion for teaching. Ms. Ramos successfully completed the Art of Medical Interpretation® course at CCCI in 2016 (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.™) and is currently a Program Coordinator and Student Enrollment Advisor at CCCI.

Tarik, DVM, Adjunct Instructor

Adjunct Instructor, Program Coordinator and Student Enrollment Advisor at CCCI. Mr. Kerkouche holds a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine with a specialization in Biotechnology of Animal Reproduction from the Institute of Veterinary Sciences of Blida, Algeria. He then, followed different trainings such as Artificial Insemination and Human Cardiac Rhythmology. Mr. Kerkouche’s passion for languages motivated him to successfully completed the Intensive Art of Medical Interpretation™ course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.™) in 2017 and to pursue interpreting.

Daniel McLean, Guest Presenter

CCCS, Inc.™ Director of Interpreter Resource and Quality Assurance, is responsible for maintaining the high standards of quality interpretation for which CCCS, Inc.™ has become renowned. He chairs the Critical Incident Team and conducts the follow-up with interpreters and customers for all reported incidents. Mr. McLean recruits trained and qualified interpreters for CCCS, Inc.™ freelance interpreting assignments. He is a trained medical interpreter, is fluent in Spanish. Mr. McLean successfully completed the Intensive Art of Medical Interpretation™ course at CCCI (60-hour certificate of accomplishment by CCCS, Inc.™), before joining CCCS, Inc.™ in 2014.

LANGUAGE COACHES

Language Coaching is provided by active, qualified interpreters who have significant experience working in the interpreting field along with superior proficiency and fluency in both English and their target language(s). Language Coaches assist students with practicing the different interpreting modes/tools (such as CIFE and Memory Aids) via role-play exercises. Evaluation tools are used and submitted to faculty; however, students are provided verbal feedback on a case-by-case basis.

CCCS, Inc.™ has been a pioneer in many different aspects. In 1996, CCCS, Inc.™ became one of the first institutes in the U.S. to teach healthcare interpreting. Our healthcare interpreting program was the result of many years of interpreting experience by CCCS Inc.”s™ founder and President Zarita Araujo-Lane, LICSW. Drawing on her experience in combination with her team that includes providers, interpreters and educators, she developed a unique program that included many firsts for the industry. Here are a few examples of how CCCS, Inc.™ has proved to be an industry leader.

Doing Business with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

CCCS, Inc.™ is a WBE, DBE and PBE certified PRF63 vendor with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This contract covers Foreign Language Interpretation and Translation. Simultaneous Interpretation Services & Equipment, Voice-over Services and Over the Phone Interpretation (OPI) are available outside the scope of PRF63. For more information regarding PRF63, please visit CommBuys.

Licensed Interpreting School

Cross Cultural Communication Institute (CCCI), a division of CCCS, Inc.™, became the first licensed postsecondary school for interpreters in NH and possibly nationwide. In addition, CCCI is in the process of applying for the same status in Massachusetts.

Language Coaches

CCCS, Inc.™ was one of the first companies and training institutions to introduce the concept of Language Coaches to the industry. Language Coaches are active experienced interpreters that work with students in small group settings where all of the students speak the same target language. Language Coaches are a key component of the course as they give personal attention to each member of the group and provide guidance and feedback to help the student improve their skills. CCCS, Inc.™ has developed a training manual for their language coaches and by the end of 2011, both training and manuals will become available to the general population.

CIFE

CIFE is an acronym that interpreters use to set the stage in a triadic encounter. This acronym is a collection of tools that help the interpreter avoid difficult situations that might occur with either the provider or patient. This tool is comprised of an introduction and oral agreement with all parties and it helps to set the stage so that all parties are aware of how the session will proceed and what guidelines will be used.

Anchoring

Anchoring is a memory aid or a tool that allows interpreters through the help of the speaker to recall part of the message that may have been lost or forgotten. This tool is much quicker than simply asking the speaker to repeat themselves, and also distinguishes the professional interpreter from the ad hoc interpreter.

Partner and Set the Tone

Partner and Set the Tone are acronyms created by CCCS, Inc.™ and are useful for Providers working with the LEP population. By means of these acronyms, providers are given the tools to help them understand some of the challenges that a LEP individual may face and at the same time encourages the provider to view the situation from the patient’s perspective. This is essential to a successful triadic encounter as many of the cultural beliefs held dearly to by the patient, may seem illogical to someone who is only familiar with western ideas and culture. Rather than judging the patient or their values and beliefs, the provider needs to be respectful and treat the patient according to the framework that the patient outlines. When this is done, patients are more likely to feel an attachment to that provider and institution, thus resulting in overall higher patient satisfaction.

Butterfly

CCCS, Inc.™ uses the butterfly as a symbol of the complexities of the interpreter’s role. As the body, or center, of the butterfly, the interpreter is the linguistic and cultural connection between the provider/customer and the patient/client. The interpreter keeps both wings in balanced interaction, gaining strength through trust, and the interpreting session takes off.

The Six Ws

As the profession is still evolving CCCS, Inc.™ has provided freelance interpreters with a tool called the 6 Ws. This is used to assist freelancers as they try to navigate through difficult ethical gray areas.

Four Character Values Model created by CCCS, Inc.™ in 1996

This model is a concrete way of bringing one to a center a zone where one cannot always show respect as respect may mean different things for different people. All individuals have honor, respect, generosity and trust. These qualities can be portrayed as a tree. This model helps individuals to see that their perception of things may vary greatly from that of the other person. It also illustrates that sometimes our actions even though they are well intentioned may produce a negative effect.

Post-Immigration Grieving Stages created by CCCS, Inc.™ in 1996

Immigrants in general come to a new country due to political, financial and geographic reasons. It takes five to ten years for an immigrant or refugee to be able to get to the USA. There is a lot of personal, family and financial sacrifice for the sake of finding a better life. The emotional life of the immigrant does not uniformly entail falling in love with the new country and discarding the old. It is not uncommon for immigrants to silently go through the following grieving stages: Honeymoon, Anger- Loss and Negotiation – Acceptance. This model helps individuals to understand the effects of immigration and how they impact the new-comer.